The London Design museum is currently showing an exhibition about Terence Conran, called ’The way we live now’. The exhibition marks Conran’s 80th birthday and is on until the 4th March. All the work is displayed in one room with a wall that divides the room, which makes it easy to navigate through. It starts with drawings made when he was a child, displaying his early interest in art and design. He started making furniture at an early age, and had a natural curiosity towards creativity. Work he made during his studies shows his interest in fabrics and pattern design at the time.

The whole exhibition is well designed using a mixture of photographs, designed objects, furniture, magazine covers, and notes to give the viewer an understanding of his life. Conran’s own studio is even built up as accurate as possible within the space, adding a personal feel to the exhibition. The display is playful with a timeline acting as a navigator, as well as this the exhibition is sectioned into areas that he was involved in, as for example Habitat, design consultancy and food.

Being predominantly known as the founder of Habitat; it is fantastic to see how much else he is involved in. The exhibition shows how much he has influenced British design and contemporary life. His impact as a designer and entrepreneur has shaped the British society in many ways from post-war Britain through the design boom of the 80’s up until the present day. Now being 80 he still plays an active role in the design scene. With his company the Conran group as well as through a scheme set up to support young and upcoming designers. Conran produced products and furniture to be used in the everyday life of a British citizen. This made a great impact on people’s appreciation for design and Habitat made it possible for people to buy well-designed objects for a decent price.

Terence Conran

The exhibition is well worth a visit as it is educational alongside being innovatively aesthetically pleasing. Read more about it here: http://designmuseum.org/exhibitions/2011/terence-conran